National Cancer Survivorship Awareness Campaign

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Purple banner with the words National Cancer Survivorship Awareness Month. Multicolored cancer ribbons in the background.

About National Cancer Survivorship Awareness Month

A cancer survivor is considered a survivor from the time of diagnosis until the end of life [1-3].  National Cancer Survivor Month, which starts on June 1 and ends on June 30, seeks to honor cancer survivors living in the United States. 

What is National Cancer Survivors Day®?

National Cancer Survivors Day® is an annual observance held the first Sunday in June. “It is a celebration for those who have survived, an inspiration for those recently diagnosed, a gathering of support for families and an outreach to the community” [4]. 

Data and Statistics

In 2018, the latest year for which incidence data is available, in the United States, 1,708,921 new cancer cases were reported, and 599, 265 people died of cancer [5]. For every 100,000 people, 436 new cancer cases were reported and 149 people died of cancer [5].

 With nearly 17 million people with a history of cancer in the United States and a little over 1.9 million new cases expected to be diagnosed in 2022, cancer continues to affect almost every American, whether through a close friend or family member, or through their own experiences [6].

The 2020 CDC Cancer Annual Report showed that overall cancer death rates decreased 1.5% on average per year from 2001 to 2017, decreasing more rapidly among men (by 1.8% per year) than among women (1.4% per year) [7]. A decline in death rates coupled by increases in incidence rates among women, children, and adolescents and young adults will likely increase the number of cancer survivors living in the U.S. [8]. By 2030, the number of cancer survivors is projected to increase by 31.4%, to 22.2 million [9]. Ultimately, the number of cancer survivors will grow, and their needs will increase as advances in cancer early detection and cancer treatment are made, and as the overall population ages, since cancer risk increases with age. 

 

Best Practices for Communicating About Cancer Survivorship

The first step in any communication campaign is to define your audience. When communicating about cancer survivorship, you will likely have one of two main audiences: 1) survivors and caregivers and 2) health care providers and other practitioners providing cancer survivorship care. The messaging in this toolkit is organized around these two main audiences, each with their own unique strategies for outreach and framing. Remember to tailor messages to your organization, since each audience may have subgroups with different needs. For example, five-year survivors who may be out of active treatment will have different screening and follow-up needs compared to survivors who are undergoing active treatment. Survivors of childhood cancers are another subgroup that will require specific messaging.

People with a history of cancer who remain in long-term or chronic treatment may feel left out of traditional survivorship programming that is typically only available to survivors who have completed active cancer treatment [10]. It is important to include this audience both in follow-up care and also when designing messaging. In its landmark 2005 report [11], From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, the National Institute of Medicine identified four key components of survivorship care.

Circle diagram showing four key components of survivorship care: prevention, surveillance, coordination, and intervention. An image of a nurse supporting a cancer survivor sits in the middle of the diagram.

When Communicating with Survivors and Caregivers

Understand the unique perspectives and needs of survivors

  • Keep the cancer information simple in your communication strategy. People with a history of cancer often face “cancer information overload” and as a result, may feel greater uncertainty and anxiety about their cancer [12]. 
  • Promote the importance of quitting smoking, increased physical activity, good nutrition, getting flu, pneumonia, and COVID-19 vaccinations, addressing emotional health via mental health referrals, and regular cancer screenings to survivors, as appropriate [13-14]. 
  • Use narratives in your messaging. Narratives can be an effective tool for communicating with survivors. Storytelling can help individuals process information, provide social connections, and convey emotional or existential issues [15].
  • Let patients know about specific resources they can request, such as survivorship care plans or long-term recommendations about screening and follow-up.

Support survivor empowerment by encouraging them to communicate their preferences to their health care team 

  • Remind survivors that communicating and advocating for their needs are effective tools to use against cancer [16]. Self-advocacy means providing survivors with the skills and tools necessary to feel comfortable about asserting themselves and communicating clearly about their cancer care needs [16].
  • Encourage survivors to enlist the help of friends, family, trusted caregivers, oncology social workers, or patient advocates to support them with treatment needs, questions, concerns, and preferences. Survivors receive support from a variety of sources.
  • Identify barriers to survivor-provider communication and work to reduce them. Some survivors have knowledge and information, but they do not feel empowered to speak up. This may be due to poor communication skills from the health care team or organizational barriers, such as lack of time and high turnover of patients [17]. Additionally, communication gaps during the transition from active treatment to long-term survivorship care may create confusion and uncertainty among cancer survivors [18].
  • Include survivors as a part of the care team through shared decision-making. Survivors tend to be more satisfied with treatment decisions when they feel they have been involved in the process [19].

When Communicating with Health Care Providers

Make content accessible on networks providers use to search for information

  • Use social media platforms to communicate with physicians. A 2018 study found that more than 80% of physicians felt it was easy to use social media, and 62% believed that social media improved the quality of patients' care [20]. 90% of physicians are social media consumers, using Internet and social media to find patient- and practice-related information [21].
  • Make sure content is in a mobile-friendly format. A 2016 survey found that 91% of physicians reported owning a smartphone and 88% used their mobile devices frequently in the clinical setting [22].
  • Invite providers to share information, collaborate and network via social media. A 2018 study found that 53% of health care professionals used social media to exchange medical knowledge with peers once or more daily, and 53% of health care professionals also reported using social media for improving interpersonal communication with peers [23].
  • Adapt your messaging for the platform you're using, whether it's Doximity or another physician-only site. Many providers use physician-only websites, such as Doximity, Sermo, Ozmosis or medical society membership websites, such as American Academy of Pediatrics or the American Medical Association [24].

Emphasize the importance of communication between patients, oncologists, and primary care providers.

  • Encourage primary care providers to ask about their patients’ overall health status, even if significant time has passed since their cancer diagnosis. Studies have shown that primary care can be as effective as specialized oncology care in ongoing management of cancer survivors’ health [25]. Decreased involvement by primary care providers is associated with worse overall care and outcomes, particularly for preventive services and non-cancer-related health conditions [26]. 
  • Remind primary care providers of their important role in coordinating care with their oncology colleagues. Facilitate collaboration among providers by better defining the role taken by primary care providers in survivorship, improving communication, and knowledge exchange between providers [27]. 
  • Prompt primary care providers to ask people with a history of cancer about their survivorship care plan. Survivors have special follow-up care needs after active therapy is completed. Survivorship care plans can improve care coordination with oncology providers, providing information about cancer treatments, late and long-term side effects and follow-up care recommendations [27].

Promote survivorship care resources

  • Inform providers of free survivorship care resources, including survivorship care plans and CDC’s survivorship resources. Check out the “Resources” table below for more information. 
  • Focus on promoting healthy behaviors to people with a history of cancer and encouraging providers to do the same. CDC recommends that follow-up care to for these individuals should focus on tobacco cessation, increased physical activity, good nutrition, ongoing vaccinations, regular cancer screenings and pain management [13-14]. 

Communicating with Diverse Audiences

Cancer health disparities are complex and affected by various factors, such as social determinants of health, behavior, biology, genetics, and more [28]. Communication-related issues may also play a role in cancer disparities [29].  Consider the information most useful to each diverse group. 

Healthy People 2030 objectives seek to increase the proportion of cancer survivors living more than five years and improving quality of life of survivors [30]. However, challenges remain with reaching these goals, particularly among minoritized racial and ethnic groups [31], which are disproportionately affected by physical, emotional, psychosocial and financial challenges that arise from being diagnosed with cancer and receiving cancer treatment [32]. Furthermore, individuals living with a cancer diagnosis from minoritized racial and ethnic groups are less likely to receive survivorship care consistent with guidelines and may have less access to culturally-appropriate post-treatment support services [31]. 

Below you will find considerations for specific audiences of cancer survivors, including: Black/African American; Hispanic/Latino/x/a; Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPI); American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN); LGBTQI individuals, and Adolescent and Young Adults (AYA).

It is important to tailor communication to these populations of focus with messaging that also addresses conditions where these communities live, learn, work and play, as these factors can impact a wide range of health risks and outcomes [33]. 

Between 2012-2018, the relative five-year survival rate for Black persons with a history of cancer is about 62.3% [5]. The most commonly diagnosed cancers are prostate, lung, colorectal cancers in Black men and breast, lung, and colorectal cancers in Black women [38]. Black cancer survivors face disparities in late and long-term effects of cancer treatments [32] and are more likely to report poorer overall quality of life post-cancer diagnosis compared to White cancer survivors [39].  For example, Black persons who have a history of breast cancer were found to have two-fold increased risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema compared with White persons [40]. Differences in health-related quality of life among Black cancer survivors are often attributed to cancer-related factors such as age, cancer stage, and type of cancer treatments received, as well as social and environmental factors such as income, health insurance status, employment status, and education [32]. A study conducted by Hastert and colleagues found that more than one third of Black cancer survivors experience social needs, such as neighborhood safety, transportation, housing stability, which can also impact their quality of life [41].  
 
Messaging for this community should be culturally appropriate for Black cancer survivors [41]. . For example, messages can serve as a platform to educate Black cancer survivors on critical elements of quality survivorship care, such as maintaining a good patient-provider relationship, practicing healthy behaviors, and seeking mental health support.  Messages may also encourage survivors to discuss concerns related to transportation, housing, and/or food security with their providers, if they are comfortable doing so. Additionally, communicate to health care providers that survivorship care planning should screen for and provide resources to address social needs.

 
Between 2012-2018, the relative five-year survival rate for Asian American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander (AANHPI) persons with a history of cancer is about 66% [42]. The most commonly diagnosed cancers are male and female breast, lung, and colorectal cancers [5]. Sub-ethnic groups within the AANHPI community have unique cultural beliefs and values that could result in different survivorship and quality of life experiences, such as variations in management of side effects and symptoms, gender roles and coping strategies [43]. For example, differences in religion, level of acculturation, cancer type and perceived social support among AANHPI breast cancer survivors were associated with varying survivorship experiences [43]. Others have reported feeling isolated in seeking social or professional help due to cultural and language barriers [44].  
 
In messaging, encourage providers to ask patients about their unique cultural characteristics that can shape a survivor’s experience and quality of life. Consider the influence of religion/spirituality, acculturation, cancer type, perceived social isolation and social support when addressing cancer survivorship among AANHPIs [43]. In one study, AANHPIs cancer survivors valued ongoing survivorship care and follow-up care significantly more than White cancer survivors [45]. Therefore, effective messaging tailored for this audience should encourage the provision of survivorship care plans and quality cancer care coordination. Survivorship care plans should be provided in the patient’s preferred language, be culturally sensitive, accessible, and used alongside patient navigators to improve delivery of care for AANHPI cancer survivors [46]. 

 
Between 2012-2018, the relative five-year survival rate for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) persons with a history of cancer is about 61%; across all cancer types, AI/AN have the lowest five-year survival rate of any U.S. racial/ethnic group [42]. Native cancer survivors are less likely to receive optimal treatment, may have a reluctance to use standard therapies, and have a lower rate of post treatment surveillance [47]. AI/AN cancer patients often have to step outside of their cultural norms during cancer treatment; they identified spirituality, family involvement, and advocacy as resources to address some of these barriers to their cancer care [48]. Alongside family, community support via cancer support groups and cancer education were also desired [49]. Furthermore, culturally tailored patient navigation is crucial for social/emotional support [47]. 
 
Advice and words of wisdom that AI/AN cancer survivors prioritized in messages to other AI/AN cancer survivors revolve around the following four themes: 1) listen to your body, 2) advocate for yourself, 3) embrace your culture and spirituality, and 4) share your story [50]. Messages tailored toward AI/AN cancer survivors should also highlight that tribal health systems are equipped with high quality prevention and wellness programs to promote quality of life for Native persons, such as tobacco cessation services, nutrition/diabetes education, and access to traditional healers, spiritual, and psychological assistance [47]. Access to native healing/praying can be helpful for this community, as spirituality is a large component of the survivorship experience among AI/AN survivors [47]. Messaging tailored toward providers should emphasize that good communication and an understanding of AI/AN cultures and lifestyles are important in establishing trust with patients [48]. 

 
By 2020, there will be about four million Hispanic cancer survivors in the U.S., representing nearly 20% of survivors in the country [51]. Cultural views, such as prioritizing familial needs over individual needs, play a big role in the survivorship experience [52]. Recognize that cultural norms, such as Hispanic male persons displaying “machismo”, an expression of masculinity that displays “toughness” in the face of challenges, may “mask” important health care needs among Hispanic cancer survivors [52]. Additionally, acculturation may play a role in the receipt of cancer treatment and follow-up care for Hispanic cancer survivors, as individuals who have adapted to U.S. culture and norms may be more open to following provider recommendations for long-term survivorship care [53]. 
 
For messaging, consider family and cultural values when communicating to enhance cancer survivorship experiences for Hispanic persons [52]. Messages tailored for health care professionals should emphasize the need for culture and language-appropriate practices and support tools to help Hispanic cancer survivors make informed care decisions [53]. Survivorship care plans and programs that address informational needs, such as health care system navigation, employment concerns, and sexuality and tailored with family, spiritual, and language adaptations in mind may be more effective [54]. 

 
There are approximately one million Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex (LGBTQI) cancer survivors in the U.S. today [55]. LGBTQI survivors may experience stigma and fear of discrimination when sharing their LGBTQI identity with oncology providers [55]. Furthermore, 88% of respondents from the OUT National Cancer Survey shared that there was no environmental indication, such as a rainbow flag, or affirming message, at their place of care [56]. Oncologists and social workers rarely address the impact of cancer treatments on LGBTQI sexuality adequately [55]. Additionally, 82% of respondents from the OUT National Cancer Survey shared that their oncology provider did not share possible options for fertility preservation with them [56]. Having the support of family and friends is often important for cancer survivors; LGBTQ persons create families which may or may not include biological relatives [56]. Furthermore, survivors and caregivers of LGBTQI persons may have difficulties finding welcoming spaces and/or support groups that they identify with, in additional to a cancer diagnosis [56]. Survivorship care plans specifically for LGBTQI cancer survivors often excludes resources specific to this community [56]. 
 
Messaging for this community should recognize that support can show up in different ways for LGBTQI cancer survivors, and that health care providers and services should build welcoming and supportive spaces for LGBTQI cancer survivors, their partners, and their families of choice. Encourage the inclusion of LGBTQI-specific information and resources in survivorship care plans to address needs post-treatment, such as referrals to community services, guidance on future cancer screenings, and psychological support services.

 
Based on estimates of new cancer cases in 2022, 4.5% of all new cases will occur among AYAs ages 15-39 and about 85% of AYAs diagnosed with cancer will survive their cancer for 5 years after diagnosis [34]. The most common cancer type among AYAs is female breast cancer and testicular cancer for male AYAs [34]. People with a history of AYA cancer may experience lingering treatment-related side effects for the remainder of life; therefore, it is important that survivors are provided ongoing, routine medical care to monitor for long-term and late effects [35].  
 
Messaging tailored for survivors and caregivers of AYA cancers should emphasize the importance of follow-up care. Encouraging routine check-up and having a survivorship plan that addresses both physical and psychological follow-up care after cancer treatment can help to promote quality of life after treatment for AYA survivors and their loved ones [36]. Messaging tailored towards health care professionals who do not routinely care for survivors of AYA cancers should encourage primary care providers to coordinate with the oncology team to provide appropriate long-term follow up care for AYAs [37]. 

 

Cancer Survivorship Resources

Resource Description
ACA Webinar: What Cancer Survivors Need to Know

The National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship hosted an Affordable Care Update: what advocates and people with a history of cancer need to know to discuss where the ACA stands and what it looks like for survivors moving forward.

Advancing Patient-Centered Cancer Survivorship Care Workshop Planning & Facilitation Guide

This guide includes a checklist, sample agendas, promotion tips, worksheets for workshop activities, and facilitation instructions for advancing patient-centered survivorship care.

American Indian Cancer Foundation

The American Indian Cancer Foundation’s (AICAF) Survivorship Program addresses the needs of Native cancer survivors, caregivers, and their families. AICAF provides collaborative technical assistance to clinics, communities and organizations working to implement or improve survivor programs for Native people.

ASCO Survivorship Care Planning Tools

This tool provides sample templates and resources for survivors’ long-term care needs.

ASPIRE Network

The Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Network to Reach Equity in Tobacco Control and Cancer (ASPIRE) Network, funded by the CDC, aims to build community capacity and facilitate the development of tobacco and cancer policy initiatives among diverse Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) communities across the United States. 

CDC Survivorship Care Plans

This resource from the CDC provides a basic overview of what a survivorship care plan is and why it is important.

Geographic Health Equity Alliance

The Geographic Health Equity Alliance (GHEA), one of eight CDC funded National Networks dedicated to reducing health disparities related to tobacco and cancer, focuses on reducing disparities in health behaviors, outcomes, and policies related to where people live, work, and play.

GW Cancer Center Training: Cancer Survivorship E-Learning Series for Health Care Providers

This course, intended for anyone who provides follow-up care to cancer survivors, explains follow up care for survivors of adult-onset cancers, covers late and long-term effects of treatment, as well as special topics in cancer survivorship care.

Journey Forward Survivorship Care Plan Builder

This resource can help create customizable survivorship care plans for patients.

Life After Treatment Guide-A Guide for American Indians & Alaska Natives

This guide contains information that AI/AN cancer survivors and their families can use to discuss life after treatment with their health care providers.

LIVESTRONG Care Plan This resource provides people with a history of cancer with information on their long-term follow-up needs.
Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancers Guidelines developed to help standardize and enhance the lifelong follow-up care of individuals who were diagnosed with cancer as children, adolescents, or young adults. 
National Behavioral Health Network for Tobacco and Cancer Control The National Behavioral Health Network (NBHN) for Tobacco & Cancer Control, funded by CDC, seeks to eliminate tobacco use and cancer disparities. NBHN serves as a resource hub for organizations, health care providers, and public health professionals seeking to address these disparities among individuals with mental illnesses and addictions.
National Cancer Survivorship Center’s Tools for Cancer Survivors and Caregivers Tools include a “Life After Treatment Guide” as well as a separate guide for AI/AN populations. 
National Cancer Survivorship Center’s Tools for Health Care Professionals Cancer survivorship care tools and resources for providers, organizations and communities. 
National Cancer Survivorship Center’s Tools for the Policy and Advocacy Community Tools include Cancer Survivorship: A Landscape Analysis, and Cancer Treatment & Survivorship Facts & Figures.
National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center Toolkit This toolkit, and accompanying Provider Tools resource, offer help with implementing the American Cancer Society cancer survivorship care guidelines for colorectal, head and neck and prostate cancers and the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology cancer survivorship care guideline for breast cancer. 
National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS) NCCS’ mission is to advocate for quality cancer care for all people touched by cancer. Founded by and for cancer survivors, NCCS works with legislators and policy makers to represent cancer patients and survivors in efforts to improve their quality of care and quality of life after diagnosis. 
National LGBTQIA+ Health Education Center-A Program of the Fenway Institute

 
Provides educational programs, resources, and consultation to health care organizations with the goal of optimizing quality, cost-effective health care for LGBTQIA+ people.
National LGBT Cancer Network The National LGBT Cancer Network, funded by the CDC, works to improve the lives of LGBT cancer survivors and those at risk through education, training and advocacy. 
National Native Network (Keep it Sacred) The National Native Network, funded by CDC, works to decrease commercial tobacco use and cancer health disparities among members of American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes across North America.
Nuestras Voces (Our Voices) Network  Nuestras Voces (Our Voices) Network, funded by CDC, aims to reduce disparities in under-resourced Hispanic communities by increasing the capacity of multi-sector networks to reduce commercial tobacco use within Hispanic communities.
OncoLife™ Survivorship Care Plan As a part of OncoLife resources, the site provides people with a history of cancer with information on their long-term follow-up needs.
Passport for Care Free online resource that provides childhood cancer survivors access to comprehensive treatment summaries, potential late effects of therapy, educational pages on survivorship issues, tailored long-term follow up care plan based on Children’s Oncology Group recommendations and more. 
Preparing for Your Doctor’s Visit: A Worksheet for People Who Have Finished Cancer Treatment This worksheet can help patients prepare for their next doctor’s visit.
SelfMade Health Network The SelfMade Health Network (SMHN), funded by the CDC, works to enhance the capacity, quality and performance of state tobacco prevention and cancer control programs to advance best and promising practices to respond to the unique needs of populations with low socio-economic characteristics.
The Center for Black Health & Equity The Center for Black Health & Equity engages health care organizations, public health officials, faith leaders, and African American communities in health promotion and disease prevention work.
Tips for Coping with COVID-19: A Resource for Cancer Survivors and Caregivers The COVID-19 pandemic continues to challenge us to find new ways to interact as a society and within our communities. This resource answers questions or concerns about how to keep caregivers and survivors, and your loved ones, as healthy as possible during this unprecedented time. 
2021 Cancer Survivorship E-Learning Series Annual Report This report helps programs/coalitions meet reporting requirements on E-Learning Series outcomes for the CDC 1701 supplement.

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National Cancer Survivorship Awareness Month Messages and Graphics

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Sample Messages for Survivors

After #cancertreatment, good communication and follow-up care remain essential. Use @TheNCI’s suggested questions to discuss #LifeAfterCancer with your doctor: https://bit.ly/3g6rd0r #CompCancer #CancerSurvivors #GWCC

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Image of purple potted plant, with purple cancer ribbon on an a pink and purple background. Text above image states "National Cancer Survivorship Month" #LifeAfterCancer

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Check out these cancer care planning tools for people with a history of #cancer from @CancerAdvocacy: https://bit.ly/2QHCeN9

#CompCancer #CancerSurvivors #GWCC

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Image of patient talking to doctor. Text above asks "what is a survivorship plan" and provides a definition.

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#Cancer and cancer treatment can have many different side effects. Review @TheNCI’s overview of common side effects and talk to your doctor about ways to minimize them. https://bit.ly/treatmentsideeffects #CompCancer #GWCC

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Image of provider supporting cancer patient. Title text reads: common side effects of cancer treatment. Bullet points with various side effects surround the image.

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There are many things you can do to stay healthy after cancer treatment. The @AmericanCancer Society has answers to questions, health tips and more: http:// bit.ly/2m3eEWN #LifeAfterCancer #GWCC

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Communicating, finding information, and making decisions after #cancer can be tricky. @CancerAdvocacy can help you with these basic skills and more: http://bit.ly/2kRqvqs #GWCC

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Image of provider sharing information with a patient on an ipad

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Learn more about the role of a patient advocate. They can support #CancerSurvivors in asking questions and getting the best possible medical care. Read more about how this service can work for you: https://bit.ly/3hJgDNE #GWCC

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Image of a group of patient advocates wearing different colored cancer ribbons. Text above states: Do you have a patient advocate? Find one on one support for cancer survivors and their loved ones by visiting www.patientadvocate.org

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Sample Messages for Caregivers

#Cancer caregivers, you must maintain your own health to care for your loved one. Check out @CDCgov's suggestions to help stay happy and healthy. Review and share: https://bit.ly/2WFCtsD #GWCC

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Image of caregiver with patient in a purple circle on a lavendar background. Text below reads: Caregiver, take care of yourself too.

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#Cancer #caregivers need resources to support survivors. You can share the @CancerAdvocacy Caring for the Caregiver toolkit to support the full team it takes to #fightcancer: https://bit.ly/2Zflyiz #GWCC

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Image of female caregiver and patient sitting on the couch reading from a tablet. Text overlay reads: Caring for the Caregiver Toolkit

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People with a history of #cancer face many changes and considerations after cancer treatment. @TheNCI #LifeAfterCancer booklet is available as a guide for #survivors, family and friends: http://bit.ly/2kRD2KT  #CompCancer #GWCC

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Image of Life After Cancer booklet on dark purple background. Text on the right reads: the National Cancer Institute's guide for people with a history of cancer, Facing Forward: Life after Cancer Treatment, is a multifaceted guide on what's next after cancer treatment. Download the PDF today!

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Sample Messages for Providers & Practitioners 

Looking for the latest info on caring for people with a history of #cancer? #PrimaryCareProviders, check out this e-learning series from @GWCancer today: www.gwccacademy.com #cancer #CompCancer #GWCC

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Image of online course titled: Cancer Survivorship E-Learning Series for Primary Care Providers. Banner image above is a stethoscope.

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Providers, plan your patients’ #cancer care using the checklists, examples and tips from @CancerAdvocacy. https://bit.ly/2zQxRa5 #GWCC

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Image of provider with her clipboard on a purple background. Text next to image reads: Cancer Care Providers, plan your patients' cancer care using checklists, examples, and tips from the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship

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Use this template to share the best #resources with your patients with #cancer. Download the worksheet: http://bit.ly/2G8Zxc1 #CompCancer #GWCC

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Image of American Cancer Society worksheet with hashtag #LifeAfterCancer. Adjacent text reads: Providers, share this worksheet with your patients to help them transition into the next phase of their cancer journey.

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Check out the National @CancerLGBT Network to review the needs and concerns of #LGBT #CancerSurvivors and access additional resources: https://bit.ly/2XgDPcs #healthequity #GWCC

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Sample Messages for COVID-19

People with a history of #cancer may be at higher risk for more serious infection if they get #COVID19. Lower your risk of infection by following @CDCgov guidance for cancer survivors and their families and caregivers: https://bit.ly/3Nvi7dv #GWCC

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Masked woman riding on bus. Adjacent text reads: The pandemic is not over yet. People with a history of cancer may be at higher risk for serious infection if they get COVID-19.

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#CancerCare Providers, check out this resource from @NCCN for managing distress and self-care during #COVID19: https://bit.ly/3aox2oJ #GWCC

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A masked female doctor looking off into the distance. Text reads: Providers, how are you managing your stress during the COVID-19 pandemic?

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  2. Highlight the corresponding message with your cursor. Right click and select "Copy."
  3. Open Facebook. If you aren't already logged in, enter your email address (or phone number) and password, then tap "Log in."
  4. Tap the post box. This box is at the top of the News Feed. If you're posting to a group, you'll find the box just below the cover photo. There will generally be a phrase like "Write something" or "What's on your mind?" in the box.
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Sample Messages for Survivors

After #cancertreatment, good communication with your physician and follow-up care remain essential. Use the National Cancer Institute’s suggested questions to discuss #LifeAfterCancer with your doctor: https://bit.ly/3g6rd0r #GWCC

Image of purple potted plant, with purple cancer ribbon on an a pink and purple background. Text above image states "National Cancer Survivorship Month" #LifeAfterCancer

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#CancerSurvivors, check out these Cancer Care planning tools for cancer survivors from the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship: https://bit.ly/2QHCeN9 #GWCC

Image of patient talking to doctor. Text above asks "what is a survivorship plan" and provides a definition.

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#Cancer and the treatment process can impact your life in many ways. Review the National Cancer Institute’s management suggestions to learn more about how to minimize side effects and feel your best as you pursue #LifeAfterCancer: https://bit.ly/treatmentsideeffects

#GWCC

 

Image of provider supporting cancer patient. Title text reads: common side effects of cancer treatment. Bullet points with various side effects surround the image.

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There are many ways to stay #healthy after surviving #cancer. Along with joy and relief, you may feel some uncertainty about how to remain cancer-free after treatment. Learn how to stay healthy through #nutrition and #lifestyle changes as you move forward: http://bit.ly/2m3eEWN #GWCC

Image of woman exercising with a trainer

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#Communicating, making decisions, and negotiating treatment options after a #cancer diagnosis can be difficult. Develop the skills you need to better meet and understand the challenges of cancer with this Cancer Survival Toolbox: http://bit.ly/2kRqvqs #GWCC

Image of provider sharing information with a patient on an ipad

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Consider enlisting the help of a #patient #advocate who can support you in asking questions and getting the best possible medical care. You can learn more about the role of a patient advocate and who can benefit from this service from the Patient Advocate Foundation. #GWCC https://bit.ly/3hJgDNE

Image of group of patient advocates wearing different colors of cancer ribbons. Text above reads: Do you have a patient advocate? Fine one on one support for cancer survivors and their loved ones by visiting www.patientadvocate.org

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Sample Messages for Caregivers

#Cancer #caregivers, you must maintain your health so that you can take care of your loved one. Use the CDC’s tips to stay happy and healthy as a cancer caregiver. Review and share: https://bit.ly/2WFCtsD #GWCC

Image of caregiver with patient in a purple circle on a lavender background. Text below reads: Caregiver, take care of yourself too.

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Oncologists, pharmacists, primary care doctors, nurses, family, friends, caregivers, and more: It takes a team to fight #cancer. The National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship’s Caring for the Caregiver toolkit offers suggestions for #caregivers to find resources and improve their skills. https://bit.ly/2Zflyiz #GWCC

Image of female caregiver and patient sitting on the couch reading from a tablet. Text overlay reads: Caring for the Caregiver Toolkit

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The National Cancer Institute’s guide for people with a history of #cancer, Facing Forward: Life After Cancer Treatment, is a multifaceted guide on what’s next after #cancer treatment. Download the PDF, Kindle or eBook to help you answer questions and manage doctor visits: http://bit.ly/2kRD2KT #GWCC  

Image of Life After Cancer booklet on a dark purple background, with text description on the right.

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Sample Messages for Providers & Practitioners

As a #primary care provider, staying up to date on how to best care for people with a history of #cancer can be difficult. Good news: a course is available from the GW Cancer Center's Online Academy! Get the latest care information today: www.gwccacademy.com #GWCC

Image of online course titled: Cancer Survivorship E-Learning Series for Primary Care Providers. Banner image above is a stethoscope.

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Use checklists, examples, and tips from the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship to help your patients with cancer create a #cancer care plan https://bit.ly/2zQxRa5 #GWCC

Image of provider with her clipboard on a purple background. Text next to image reads: Cancer Care Providers, plan your patients' cancer care using checklists, examples, and tips from the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship

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Support your patient’s #empowerment and point them in the right direction. Help your patients as they transition out of formal #cancer treatment using this streamlined #resource list: http://bit.ly/2G8Zxc1 #GWCC

Image of patient worksheet on life after cancer. Adjacent text reads: Providers, share this worksheet with your patients to help them transition into the next phase of their cancer journey.

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LGBTQI+ people with a history of #cancer want specialized support. Review the resources from the National LGBT Cancer Network to learn about their nuanced needs and concerns to better support your #LGBTQI patients: https://bit.ly/2XgDPcs  #GWCC

Image of gay couple reading information together on a phone

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Sample Messages for COVID-19

People with a history of #cancer may be at higher risk for more serious infection if they get COVID-19. Lower your risk of infection by following this CDC guidance for cancer survivors and their families and caregivers: https://bit.ly/3Nvi7dv #GWCC

Masked woman riding on bus. Adjacent text reads: The pandemic is not over yet. People with a history of cancer may be at higher risk for serious infection if they get COVID-19.

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#Cancer Care Providers, check out this resource from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network for managing #distress and #self-care during COVID-19: https://bit.ly/3aox2oJ #GWCC

Image of masked female doctor looking into the distance. Text reads: Providers, how are you managing your stress during the COVID-19 pandemic?

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LinkedIn

How to Post on LinkedIn
  1. Download the suggested graphic.
  2. Highlight the corresponding message with your cursor. Right click and select "Copy."
  3. Open LinkedIn. If you aren't already logged in, enter your email address and password, then tap "Log in."
  4. Tap "Start a post" from the main share box. This box is at the top of your profile.
  5. Tap "Photo" from the top of the post screen, then select the downloaded graphic to upload and tap "Done." Doing so adds the photo to your post.
  6. Tap "Post." It's in the the bottom-right. Doing so will create your post and add it to the page you're on.
Message Suggested Graphic

We all envision a world where we defeat #cancer. During National #Cancer #Survivorship month, consider how you can show your support for everyone who has fought cancer by using these National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center #advocacy and #policy tools. #GWCC https://bit.ly/3fWpXNj 

Image of cancer survivor wearing a head covering, flexing her arm and looking out into a window. Text reads: Envision a world where we defeat cancer

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#Oncology and cancer care professionals: #Survivorship care plans are a valuable tool for increasing communication between collaborating #health care professionals and between health care professionals and people with a history of #cancer. The National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship has helpful information. Learn more and access customizable #survivorship #care plan templates: http://bit.ly/2l1Gp4q #GWCC 

Image of cancer care providers supporting each other. Background is pink with purple foliage. Text reads: Providers, do you use survivorship care plans for patients with a history of cancer?

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June 5, 2022 is National Cancer #Survivors Day! Spread the word about #cancer #survivorship with this summary from the American Cancer Society: https://bit.ly/2RjM9Jr #GWCC

Image of purple cancer ribbons, purple hands overlaid on transparent image of the U.S. Text overlay reads: June 5, 2022 is National Cancer Survivors Day

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Instagram

How to Post on Instagram
  1. Download the suggested graphic.
  2. Highlight the corresponding message with your cursor. Right click and select "Copy."
  3. Open Instagram. If you aren't already logged in, enter your username (or phone number) and password, then tap "Log in."
  4. Tap the plus sign box. This box is at the top right. Select the downloaded graphic or drag it into the box to upload it.
  5. Select "Square (1:1)" for the aspect ratio, then click "Next."
  6. Ignore the filters screen, then click "Next" again.
  7. Paste the caption where it says, "Write a caption..." at the top.
  8. Under "Accessibility," consider adding alt text to describe the photo for people with visual impairments.
  9. Tap "Share." It's in the bottom-right corner of the screen.
Message Suggested Graphic
Sample Messages for Survivors 

After #cancertreatment, good communication and follow-up care remain essential. Check out @nationalcancerinstitute for suggested questions to discuss #LifeAfterCancer with your doctor #CompCancer #CancerSurvivors #GWCC

Image of purple potted plant, with purple cancer ribbon on an a pink and purple background. Text above image states "National Cancer Survivorship Month" #LifeAfterCancer

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#CancerSurvivors, check out these cancer care planning tools from @cancersurvivorship! Advocate for quality cancer care for yourself and everyone touched by cancer. Visit canceradvocacy.org/resources/care-planning-for-cancer-survivors

#CancerSurvivors #LifeAfterCancer #GWCC

Image of patient talking to doctor. Text above asks "what is a survivorship plan" and provides a definition.

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#Cancer and cancer treatment can have many different side effects. Review @nationalcancerinstitute’s overview of common side effects and talk to your doctor about ways to minimize them. Visit cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/side-effects for more info. #LifeAfterCancer #GWCC

Image of provider supporting cancer patient. Title text reads: common side effects of cancer treatment. Bullet points with various side effects surround the image.

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There are many things you can do to stay healthy after #cancer treatment. The @AmericanCancerSociety has answers to questions, health tips and more. Visit cancer.org/treatment/survivorship-during-and-after-treatment/be-healthy-after-treatment for more info! #LifeAfterCancer #GWCC

Image of woman exercising with a trainer

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Communicating, finding information, and making decisions after a #cancer diagnosis can be tricky. @CancerSurvivorship can help you with these basic skills and more: canceradvocacy.org/resources/cancer-survival-toolbox/

#CancerSurvivor #GWCC

Image of provider sharing information with a patient on an ipad

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Learn more about the role of a #PatientAdvocate. They can support #CancerSurvivors in asking questions and getting the best possible medical care. Read more about how this service can work for you at patientadvocate.org. #GWCC 

Image of group of patient advocates wearing different colors of cancer ribbons. Text above reads: Do you have a patient advocate? Fine one on one support for cancer survivors and their loved ones by visiting www.patientadvocate.org

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Sample Messages for Caregivers

#Cancer caregivers, you must maintain your own health to care for your loved one. Check out @CDC_Cancer’s suggestions to help stay happy and healthy. Review and share: cdc.gov/cancer/survivors/caregivers/caring-for-yourself. #GWCC

Image of caregiver with patient in a purple circle on a lavender background. Text below reads: Caregiver, take care of yourself too.

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#Cancer #caregivers need resources to support survivors. You can share the @CancerAdvocacy Caring for the Caregiver toolkit to support the full team it takes to #fightcancer. Check out canceradvocacy.org for more info. #GWCC

Image of female caregiver and patient sitting on the couch reading from a tablet. Text overlay reads: Caring for the Caregiver Toolkit

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People with a history of #cancer face many changes and considerations after cancer treatment. @NationalCancerInstitute #LifeAfterCancer booklet is available as a guide for survivors, family and friends. Check it out at cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/life-after-treatment.pdf #CompCancer #GWCC

Image of Life After Cancer booklet on a dark purple background, with text description on the right.

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Sample Messages for Providers & Practitioners

#PrimaryCareProviders, looking for the latest info on caring for people with a history of #cancer? Primary care providers, check out this e-learning series at gwccacademy.com #cancer #CompCancer #GWCC

Image of online course titled: Cancer Survivorship E-Learning Series for Primary Care Providers. Banner image above is a stethoscope.

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#Providers, plan your patients’ #cancer care using the checklists, examples and tips from @CancerAdvocacy. Visit canceradvocacy.org/resources/tools-for-care-providers/planning-your-patients-care for more info. #GWCC

Image of provider with her clipboard on a purple background. Text next to image reads: Cancer Care Providers, plan your patients' cancer care using checklists, examples, and tips from the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship

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#CancerCareProviders, use this template to share the best resources with your patients with #cancer. Download “A Cancer Survivor’s Prescription for Finding Information” from @AmericanCancerSociety #CompCancer #GWCC

Image of patient worksheet on life after cancer. Adjacent text reads: Providers, share this worksheet with your patients to help them transition into the next phase of their cancer journey.

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#CancerCareProviders, check out the National @CancerLGBT Network to review the needs and concerns of #LGBT #CancerSurvivors and access additional resources #healthequity #GWCC

Image of gay couple reading information together on a phone

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Sample Messages for COVID-19

People with a history of #cancer may be at higher risk for more serious infection if they get #COVID19. Lower your risk of infection by following @CDCgov guidance at cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/about/covid-19. #GWCC

Masked woman riding on bus. Adjacent text reads: The pandemic is not over yet. People with a history of cancer may be at higher risk for serious infection if they get COVID-19.

Download Graphic

#CancerCareProviders, check out resources from @NCCNorg for managing distress and self-care during #COVID19. Visit ncccn.org for more info. #GWCC

Image of masked provider looking out into the distance. Text reads: Providers, how are you managing your stress during the COVID-19 pandemic?

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Download All Messages and Graphics

Social media management tools like Hootsuite and Sprout Social offer bulk scheduling options for uploading multiple messages at once. The spreadsheets below can be adapted to fit multiple scheduling platforms or services. They are currently formatted to work with Sprout Social's bulk scheduling option. Please review the bulk scheduling format requirements for your specific platform before posting. Messages are sorted by network.

Download All Twitter Messages

Download All Facebook Messages

Download All LinkedIn Messages

Download All Instagram Messages

If you would like to download all images in this social media toolkit, click on each network below for a zip file with each network's graphics. Please note that these image sizes are slightly smaller than the links above due to file size limitations. If you would like to download full resolution versions, simply click on the "Download Graphic" link below each image in the message tables above.

Download All Twitter Graphics

Download All Facebook Graphics

Download All LinkedIn Graphics

Download All Instagram Graphics

References

  1. National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (2021). Our History. https://canceradvocacy.org/about/our-history/
  2. National Cancer Institute. (n.d.). NCI Dictionary of cancer terms – definition of “survivor” [webpage]. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/survivor 
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021a). Supporting Cancer Survivors and Caregivers. https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ncccp/priorities/cancer-survivor-caregiver.htm
  4. National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation (2022). About National Cancer Survivors Day®. https://ncsd.org/about-us/
  5. U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021). United States Cancer Statistics Working Group, U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations Tool, based on 2020 submission data (1999-2018). Retrieved from https://gis.cdc.gov/Cancer/USCS/DataViz.html
  6. American Cancer Society. (2022). Cancer Facts and Figures: 2022. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/annual-cancer-facts-and-figures/2022/2022-cancer-facts-and-figures.pdf
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, March 12). Annual report to the nation: Cancer death rates continue to decline. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2020/p0312-annual-report.html 
  8. Islami, F., Ward, E. M., Sung, H., Cronin, K. A., Tangka, F. K. L., Sherman, R. L., Zhao, J., Anderson, R. N., Henley, S. J., Yabroff, K. R., Jemal, A., & Benard, V. B. (2021). Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, Part 1: National Cancer Statistics. JNCI : Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 113(12), 1648–1669. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djab131
  9. National Cancer Institute (2022). Statistics and Graphs. Office of Cancer Survivorship. https://cancercontrol.cancer.gov/ocs/statistics#stats
  10. MedStar Health (2022). Cancer Survivorship Program. https://www.medstarhealth.org/services/cancer-survivorship-program
  11. National Institute of Medicine. (2005). From cancer patient to cancer survivor: Lost in transition. Hewitt, M., Greenfield, S., & Stovall, E. (Eds.). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Retrieved from https://www.nap.edu/read/11468/chapter/1 
  12. Chae J. (2017). The role of intolerance of uncertainty in the repeated exposure to cancer information. Journal of psychosocial oncology, 35(3), 335–345. https://doi.org/10.1080/07347332.2016.1277822
  13. Underwood, J.M., Townsend, J.S., Stewart, S.L., Buchannan, N., Ekwueme, D.U., Haskins, N.A….Fairley, T.L. (2012). Surveillance of demographic characteristics and health behaviors among adult cancer survivors – behavioral risk factor surveillance system, United States, 2009. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 61(SS01), 1-23. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss6101a1.htm
  14. Sauer, A. G., Siegel, R. L., Jemal, A., & Fedewa, S. A. (2017). Updated review of prevalence of major risk factors and use of screening tests for cancer in the united states. Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention: a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 26(8), 1192–1208. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-17-0219
  15. Briant, K.J., Halter, A., Marchello, N., Escareno, M., & Thompson, B. (2016). The power of digital storytelling as a culturally relevant health promotion tool. Health Promotion Practice, 17(6), 793-801. https://doi.org/10.1177/1524839916658023
  16. National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship. (n.d.) Becoming a self-advocate [webpage]. https://www.canceradvocacy.org/resources/advocating-for-yourself/becoming-a-self-advocate-2/
  17. Pel-Littel, Snaterse, M., Teppich, N. M., Buurman, B. M., van Etten-Jamaludin, F. S., van Weert, J. C. M., Minkman, M. M., & Scholte op Reimer, W. J. M. (2021). Barriers and facilitators for shared decision making in older patients with multiple chronic conditions: a systematic review. BMC Geriatrics, 21(1), 112–112. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-021-02050-y
  18. Mayer, D.K., Nasso, S. F., & Earp, J. A. (2017). Defining cancer survivors, their needs, and perspectives on survivorship health care in the USA. The Lancet Oncology, 18(1), e11–e18. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(16)30573-3
  19. Josfeld, L., Keinki, C., Pammer, C., Zomorodbakhsch, B., & Hübner, J. (2021). Cancer patients' perspective on shared decision-making and decision aids in oncology. Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology, 147(6), 1725–1732. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00432-021-03579-6
  20. Irfan, K. S., Farhana, I., Maya, N., Abdullah, A., & Gominda, P. (2018). Family physicians' utility of social media: a survey comparison among family medicine residents and physicians. African Health Sciences, 18(3), 817-827. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6307000/ 
  21. Bhaskar, S. (2017). Examining physician use of social media in 2017. Retrieved from https://www.pm360online.com/examining-physician-use-of-social-media-in-2017/
  22. Nerminathan, A., Harrison, A., Phelps, M., Scott, K. M., & Alexander, S. (2017). Doctors’ use of mobile devices in the clinical setting: a mixed methods study. Internal medicine journal, 47(3), 291-298. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/imj.13349 
  23.  Hazzam, J. & Lahrech, A. (2018). Health care professionals’ social media behavior and the underlying factors of social media adoption and use: quantitative study. J Med Internet Res, 20(11):e12035 Retrieved from https://www.jmir.org/2018/11/e12035/
  24. Fogelson, N. S., Rubin, Z. A., & Ault, K. A. (2013, September). Beyond Likes and Tweets: An In-depth Look at the Physician Social Media Landscape. Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, 56(3), 495-508. Retrieved from https://journals.lww.com/clinicalobgyn/Abstract/2013/09000/Beyond_Likes_and_Tweets___An_In_depth_Look_at_the.11.aspx 
  25. Jefford, M., Koczwara, B., Emery, J., Thornton-Benko, E., & Vardy, J. (2020). The important role of general practice in the care of cancer survivors. Australian Journal of General Practice, 49(5), 289–292. https://doi.org/10.31128/AJGP-10-19-5133
  26. Jain, J., Qorri, B., & Szewczuk, M. R. (2019). The crucial role of primary care providers in the long-term follow-up of adult survivors of childhood cancer. Cancer Management and Research, 11, 3411-3418. https://doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S197644 
  27. Chaput, G., Med, C. P., & Sussman, J. (2019). Integrating primary care providers through the seasons of survivorship. Current oncology (Toronto, Ont.), 26(1), 48–54. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.26.4687
  28. National Cancer Institute. (2020). Cancer disparities. Retrieved August 11, 2021 from https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/understanding/disparities 
  29. White-Means, S., and Osmani, A. R. (2017). Racial and ethnic disparities in patient-provider communication with breast cancer patients: Evidence from 2011 MEPS and experiences with cancer supplement. INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, 54, 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1177/0046958017727104
  30. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (n.d.) Healthy People 2030-Cancer Objectives. https://health.gov/healthypeople/objectives-and-data/browse-objectives/cancer
  31. Lee Smith, J., & Hall, I. J. (2015). Advancing Health Equity in Cancer Survivorship: Opportunities for Public Health. American journal of preventive medicine, 49(6 Suppl 5), S477–S482. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2015.08.008
  32. American Association for Cancer Research (2020). AACR Cancer Disparities Progress Report 2020. https://cancerprogressreport.aacr.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/09/AACR_CDPR_2020.pdf
  33. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021). About Social Determinants of Health (SDOH). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/socialdeterminants/about.html
  34. National Cancer Institute (n.d.). SEER Cancer Stat Facts: Cancer Among Adolescents and Young Adults (AYAs). National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD. Retrieved April 28, 2022 from https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/aya.html
  35. American Cancer Society. Cancer Treatment & Survivorship Facts & Figures 2019-2021. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2019. https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/cancer-treatment-and-survivorship-facts-and-figures/cancer-treatment-and-survivorship-facts-and-figures-2019-2021.pdf
  36. National Cancer Institute (2020). Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer. https://www.cancer.gov/types/aya
  37. Children’s Oncology Group (2018). Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancers, Version 5.0 (October 2018). http://survivorshipguidelines.org/
  38. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures for African American/Black People 2022-2024. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, 2022. https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/cancer-facts-and-figures-for-african-americans/2022-2024-cff-aa.pdf
  39. Beebe-Dimmer, J. L., Albrecht, T. L., Baird, T. E., Ruterbusch, J. J., Hastert, T., Harper, F., Simon, M. S., Abrams, J., Schwartz, K. L., & Schwartz, A. G. (2019). The Detroit Research on Cancer Survivors (ROCS) Pilot Study: A Focus on Outcomes after Cancer in a Racially Diverse Patient Population. Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 28(4), 666–674. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-0123
  40. Kwan, M.L., Yao, S., Lee, V. S., Roh, J. M., Zhu, Q., Ergas, I. J., Liu, Q., Zhang, Y., Kutner, S. E., Quesenberry, C. P., Ambrosone, C. B., & Kushi, L. H. (2016). Race/ethnicity, genetic ancestry, and breast cancer-related lymphedema in the Pathways Study. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 159(1), 119–129. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-016-3913-x
  41. Hastert, T.A., McDougall, J. A., Strayhorn, S. M., Nair, M., Beebe‐Dimmer, J. L., & Schwartz, A. G. (2021). Social needs and health‐related quality of life among African American cancer survivors: Results from the Detroit Research on Cancer Survivors study. Cancer, 127(3), 467–475. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.33286
  42. National Cancer Institute (n.d.). Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program. Survival database: All Cancer Sites Combined, SEER 5-Year Relative Survival Rates, 2012-2018. Retrieved April 28, 2022 from www.seer.cancer.gov 
  43. Chee, W. & Im, E.-O. (2021). Sub-Ethnicity and Survivorship Experience: Asian American Breast Cancer Survivors. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 19394592110319–1939459211031990. https://doi.org/10.1177/01939459211031990
  44. Warmoth, K., Cheung, B., You, J., Yeung, N. C., & Lu, Q. (2017). Exploring the social needs and challenges of Chinese American immigrant breast cancer survivors: A qualitative study using an expressive writing approach. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 24(6), 827–835. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12529-017-9661-4
  45. Acoba, J.D., Tamashiro, S., & Chock, M. (2020). Perceived value of cancer survivorship care among Asians and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 38(15_suppl), e22522–e22522. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2020.38.15_suppl.e22522
  46. Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum (2017, March). Making Cancer Survivorship Care Plans More Inclusive of Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Communities. https://www.apiahf.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/March-2017_Making-Cancer-Survivorship-Care-Plans-More-Inclusive-of-AANHPI-Communities-1.pdf
  47. Sieloff, B. (2022). Webinar: Cancer Survivorship Care [webinar]. National Native Network. https://keepitsacred.itcmi.org/2022/02/webinar-cancer-survivorship-care/
  48. Haozous, E. A., Doorenbos, A., Alvord, L. A., Flum, D. R., & Morris, A. M. (2016). Cancer Journey for American Indians and Alaska Natives in the Pacific Northwest
. Oncology nursing forum, 43(5), 625–635. https://doi.org/10.1188/16.ONF.625-635
  49. Burnette, C. E., Roh, S., Liddell, J., & Lee, Y. S. (2019). American Indian Women Cancer Survivor's Needs and Preferences: Community Support for Cancer Experiences. Journal of cancer education : the official journal of the American Association for Cancer Education, 34(3), 592–599. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-018-1346-4
  50. Bastian, T.D. & Burhansstipanov, L. (2020). Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Hope: Strategies Used by Native American Cancer Survivors to Restore Quality of Life. JCO Global Oncology, 6(6), 161–166. https://doi.org/10.1200/JGO.19.00215
  51. Kronenfeld, J.P., Graves, K. D., Penedo, F. J., & Yanez, B. (2021). Overcoming Disparities in Cancer: A Need for Meaningful Reform for Hispanic and Latino Cancer Survivors. The Oncologist (Dayton, Ohio), 26(6), 443–452. https://doi.org/10.1002/onco.13729
  52. Santee, E., King, K. A., Vidourek, R. A., & Merianos, A. L. (2018). Health Care Access and Health Behavior Quality of Life among Hispanic/Latino-American Cancer Survivors. Applied Research in Quality of Life, 15(3), 637–650. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-018-9677-1
  53. Advani, P., Bondy, M., Thompson, P. A., Martínez, M. E., Nodora, J. N., Vernon, S. W., Diamond, P., Burnett, J., & Brewster, A. M. (2018). Impact of acculturation on breast cancer treatment and survivorship care among Mexican American patients in Texas. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 12(5), 659–668. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-018-0703-y
  54. Valle, C.G., Padilla, N., Gellin, M., Manning, M., Reuland, D. S., Rios, P., Lane, G., Lewis, V., & Rosenstein, D. L. (2019). Ahora qué?: Cultural Adaptation of a Cancer Survivorship Intervention for Latino/a Cancer Survivors. Psycho-Oncology (Chichester, England), 28(9), 1854–1861. https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.5164
  55. National LGBT Cancer Network (n.d.) Cancer and the LGBT Community. https://cancer-network.org/cancer-information/cancer-and-the-lgbt-community/
  56. Scout, NFN; Rhoten, B. (2021) OUT: The National Cancer Survey, Summary of Findings. Providence, RI: National LGBT Cancer Network https://cancer-network.org/out-the-national-cancer-survey/

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Latest Resources

This webinar addressed how to produce videos to expand public health messaging.
The purpose of this toolkit is to help state and territorial health agencies build and sustain partnerships with non-traditional, non-public health sectors.
Consider the insights and tips in this resource to center trust in your public health communications.