Viral Hepatitis and Liver Cancer Prevention Profiles

October 6, 2021
Authored by

To help improve policy makers and cancer control professionals’ awareness of viral hepatitis risk factors and evidence-based prevention strategies, The George Washington University Cancer Center, in collaboration with CDC, developed educational materials on viral hepatitis and liver cancer. By accessing the map, policy makers and cancer control professionals will find state profiles on viral hepatitis and liver cancer statistics that can be used when communicating with clinicians and stakeholders.

View the Viral Hepatitis and Liver Cancer Prevention State Profiles

State profiles on viral hepatitis and liver cancer statistics that can be used when communicating with clinicians and stakeholders.

View the Viral Hepatitis & Liver Cancer Prevention Profile (PDF)

National liver cancer profile (non-state specific) with general information about viral hepatitis and liver cancer.

View the Strategies to Reduce Viral Hepatitis-Associated Liver Cancer (PDF)

Shares the National Academy of Sciences report findings in a cancer context for use by policy makers and the cancer community.

View What Can Public Health Professionals Do to Help Reduce Viral-Hepatitis Related Liver Cancer 

A worksheet to help public health professionals address the burden of viral hepatitis.

View the Eliminating the Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus to Reduce Viral-Hepatitis Related Liver Cancer (PPT)

 A "train-the-trainer" adaptable presentation for public health professionals to communicate with CCC stakeholders about the burden of viral hepatitis.

Latest Resources

October 22, 2021
Data brief showing cancer incidence rates for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations living in select urban areas vary by geographic region. Rates in certain regions, such as Alaska and the Southern Plains, are higher in urban AI/AN compared with White populations.
October 22, 2021
Get the facts about electronic cigarettes, their health effects and the risks of using e-cigarettes.
October 22, 2021
Cancer was the second leading cause of death, after heart disease, in the United States in 2019. In 2019, there were 599,601 cancer deaths; 283,725 were among females and 315,876 among males.